Lead





United States

Housing Units with a High Risk of Lead Hazards
http://scorecard.goodguide.com/env-releases/lead/
http://scorecard.goodguide.com/env-releases/lead/







Map Legend:
Number of Housing Units with a High Risk of Lead Hazards
external image lead_l5.gif
highest 20% of states
external image lead_l4.gif
second highest 20% of states
external image lead_l3.gif
middle 20% of states
external image lead_l2.gif
second lowest 20% of states
external image lead_l1.gif
lowest 20% of states

Fact Box
Symbol: Pb
Atomic number: 82
Atomic mass: 207.2
Density: 11.342 grams per cubic centimeter
Boiling Point: 1,749 Celsius
Melting Point: 327.46 Celsius
Group: 14
Period: 6
Key Isotopes: 204-Pb, 206Pb, 207-Pb, 208-Pb
Common Compound: Lead monoxide, Lead dioxide

Characteristics

Lead is a metal and it is soft, shiny, and malleable, or able to flatten with a hammer and not break. It is also corrosion resistant. Lead is a shiny blue and white color, but it turns gray when exposed to air. It is also solid at room temperature. It is a poor conductor and it is not very reactive.
http://academic.emporia.edu/abersusa/go336/morris/
http://academic.emporia.edu/abersusa/go336/morris/





Uses

Lead can be used to repel x-rays, a sound absorber and a vibration absorber, and also to repel radiation. Lead was once used for batteries, paints, solders, and water pipes. The government then began eliminating these harmful products.

Harmful Effects

Lead damages the nervous system, causing learning problems, slow growth, hearing issues and headaches in children. Adults can have high blood pressure, hypertension, nerve disorders, muscle and joint pain, and memory issues.

Source

Lead can be found pure naturally, but that is uncommon. It can be easily refined from the mineral galena. Lead is quite abundant.

Metabolism

Lead can either be inhaled or swallowed, and it can be stored in the lungs, kidneys, liver, bones, or fatty tissues.

History

Lead was discovered in ancient times, and we don't know who discovered it. It was used for coins, writing tablets, and statues. The Romans also used lead in their plumbing. Lead's symbol comes from the Latin word for plumbing, plumbum.






Sources
http://education.jlab.org/itselemental/ele082.html
http://chemistry.about.com/od/elementfacts/a/lead.htm
http://chemistry.about.com/od/elementgroup/a/metals.htm
http://www.epa.gov/region2/lead/
http://www.chemeddl.org/resources/ptl/index.php
http://www.niehs.nih.gov/health/topics/agents/lead/
http://www.cleanwaterpartners.org/lead-poisoning.html
http://www.chemicool.com/elements/lead.html